FDA approves new drug to treat advanced breast cancer

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The Food and Drug Administration has approved Piqray (alpelisib) tablets to treat men and postmenopausal women whose advanced breast cancer is hormone receptor (HR)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative and PIK3CA-mutated.

Piqray is to be used in combination with the FDA-approved endocrine therapy fulvestrant. The PIK3CA-mutated, advanced or metastatic breast cancer (as detected by an FDA-approved test) is indicated following progression on or after an endocrine-based regimen.

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Yes, Virginia, you should eat your broccoli

Broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables (such as arugula, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, collard greens,  cauliflower, and kale) “contain a molecule that inactivates a gene known to play a role in a variety of common human cancers” although you can’t eat your way to cancer suppression.

Scientists at Harvard Medical School’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center discovered that an enzyme which plays a role in many cancers “can be inhibited with a natural compound found in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables.” Their research is preliminary, focused on prostate cancer prone mice and human cells.

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Reframing metastatic breast cancer

metastatic breast cancer

On a cold, bright Sunday afternoon during New York Fashion Week, nearly six hundred people packed into an old building in Manhattan’s Lower East Side for an unusual lingerie show.

It was the third annual #Cancerland fashion show sponsored by the lingerie company AnaOno and METAvivor, a nonprofit organization advocating for metastatic breast cancer (MBC) research and awareness.

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Replumbing the lymphatic system with a pill: still a dream

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Currently no U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved therapy can reestablish lymphatic circulation after a patient develops lymphedema. Up to 10 million people in the United States and more than 100 million around the world have lymphedema.

A phase II clinical trial at Stanford University School of Medicine tested whether the drug ubenimex, a leukemia treatment used in Japan, can spur the growth of new lymphatic vessels for patients with secondary leg lymphedema. It was the “first pharmaceutical company-sponsored trial for a medical treatment of lymphedema.”

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